ESPN to layoff on-air talent: It’s because they’re too liberal

(photo via ESPN)

(photo via ESPN)

Liberalism has corrupted ESPN to its core, and now they’re attempting to clean house.

In a new report from Sports Illustrated, the sports media giant is said to be laying off a number of on-air personalities who appear on TV, radio, and online. The reported cuts will not affect “rank-and-file” employees.

“ESPN will have significant cost-cutting over the next four months on its talent side (people in front of the camera or audio/digital screen),” SI reported. “Multiple sources said ESPN has been tasked with paring tens of millions of staff salary from its payroll, including staffers many viewers and readers will recognize. Those with contracts coming up would be particularly vulnerable, sources said.”

This should come as no surprise to objective viewers of the sports network. The company has suffered tremendously in the ratings. ESPN suffered its worst ratings performance in nine years in 2016.

Not only did coverage of the 2016 election have something to do with their ratings tumble, but the on-air personalities themselves have veered further to the left, especially during the rise of Donald Trump.

ESPN broke the cardinal rule in which their personalities and anchors veered into politics when it wasn’t necessary. Additionally, they shunned conservative opinions. In April 2016, former ESPN analyst and MLB pitcher Curt Schilling was fired by the network over posts he made on social media that were deemed “offensive.”

Here are some examples of ESPN’s overt liberal agenda:

EPSN host Michelle Beadle’s Twitter timeline is chock full of Trump hate.

When Stephen A. Smith called for respect for black leaders who met with President Trump, he was raked over the coals.

Former ESPN anchor Robert Flores injected identity politics into his coverage of an NFL game. In November 2015, he had a hot take about the treatment of Kansas City Chiefs TE Travis Kelce compared to Carolina Panthers QB Cam Newton.

Flores left ESPN for the MLB/NHL network in February 2017.

There is certainly nothing wrong with these sports personalities injecting their political opinion into coverage of sports or their Twitter accounts, and they have every right to do so. However, there are consequences with every action they make being in the public spotlight. They have to know that roughly half of their audience will react positively to their comments, while the other half will react negatively.

ESPN and many of its personalities are learning quickly that even they don’t have a safe space.


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