Trump’s revamped agenda: The great, bad, and ugly for millennials

(AP Photo)

(AP Photo)

Tuesday night, President Trump outlined his plans for the nation. In his proposals, millennials were left with the great, the bad, and the ugly.

A minority — 37 percent — of young voters chose Trump in 2016, yet all of us millennials are impacted by his policies. That’s why I was relieved to hear him double down on his plans to repeal and replace Obamacare in last night’s address. Since the implementation of Obamacare, I have come across several of my peers whose health care premiums tripled. They were forced to choose between health insurance and groceries, and most of them chose groceries. That is one of the many reasons government implemented healthcare is insolvent.

President Trump outlined some of the very real issues with Obamacare, highlighting Kentucky’s latest problem: “One third of counties have only one insurer on the exchanges — leaving many Americans with no choice at all.”

Healthy millennials are forced to pick up the bill with premiums that are doubling and tripling. To a lot of millennials, that’s enough to break the bank.

Ask any young person if they want to be forced to buy government healthcare, and they’ll probably tell you they can’t afford it. Healthy young people don’t want to pay high price tags for insurance. Instead, they want to keep their hard earned money to pay college tuition, buy a car, or save for their future.

One of Trump’s greatest campaign promises, repealing Obamacare, is exactly what millennials want to see from Congress and the President. It gets the federal government out of the way and lets them choose for themselves how they want to handle their personal, medical care. The bottom line is this: their is nothing affordable about the ironically named Affordable Care Act. It is unsustainable and must be repealed.

Millennials are not only fiscally aware, we also desire consistency and honesty from our leaders. The hard, honest truth is that America is broke. As the nation quickly approaches $20 trillion in debt, Trump’s calls to increase defense spending, with domestic offsets, seem like two steps back and one step forward in “draining the swamp.”

We currently spend more on our military than the next eight countries combined, and the spending goes unchecked within the Pentagon. We have no idea exactly how the billions upon billions in taxpayer dollars are being managed by the Department of Defense. Until there is a full audit of the Pentagon, why should we so willingly throw more money their way? In the past, this has only lead to more government waste, corruption, and poor military investments abroad.

We have seen over $5 trillion of taxpayer dollars thrown into a 16-year nation-building effort in the Middle East. Part of millennials’ demand for consistency means supporting politicians that aren’t afraid to cut all spending, and that includes scaling back unnecessary military interventionism abroad. If the president wants to end regime change in the Middle East – a policy he supported on the campaign trail – he should be advocating for a decrease in spending across the board.

Instead, Trump proposed the largest defense spending increase in American history.

Last night, Trump not only illustrated his desire to ramp up military spending, but he also proposed a $1 trillion investment in domestic infrastructure spending. How exactly does the President plan to drain the swamp when he wants to write Washington a $1 trillion check? For many pro-liberty millennials like myself, that sounds like more of the same from Washington.

The President can’t have it both ways. He’ll either have to reform Washington by tightening spending, or he’ll continue to burn through taxpayer dollars as Obama did. President Trump cannot illustrate wasteful government spending while in the same breath call on Congress to spend more than they ever have. It’s this kind of glaring inconsistency and political pandering that turned America away from the former secretary of state Hillary Clinton in the last election.

As millennials, we are particularly skeptical of the government, yet we are the ones that have to pay America’s $20 trillion debt. If Trump truly wants to ‘Make America Great Again,’ he will have to show the American people that he’s serious about cutting government waste across the board.

If millennials learned one thing from Obama’s presidency, it is not to trust a politician on their word, but on their actions. Will President Trump step up to the plate and put his money where his mouth is? Or is he simply paying lip service to the party that elected him? As the next generation of voters, we will be anxiously awaiting to see how it pans out.


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