Breaking News

NOMINATIONS OPEN -- Red Alert Politics 2017 "30 Under 30" List

GOP shouldn’t create their own 2,700 omnibus bill to replace Obamacare

Senate Maj. Ldr. Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan are struggling to find the ideal replacement to Obamacare. If anything, they should do it step-by-step. (Photo via AP)

Senate Maj. Ldr. Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan are struggling to find the ideal replacement to Obamacare. If anything, they should do it step-by-step. (Photo via AP)

House and Senate Republicans are hastily trying to find a health care plan to replace Obamacare once it’s repealed. According to a leaked recording of a closed door meeting in Philadelphia last Thursday, GOP leaders expressed concern about how they could find a better, long-term health care solution.

“We’d better be sure that we’re prepared to live with the market we’ve created [with repeal],” Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.) said. “That’s going to be called Trumpcare. Republicans will own that lock, stock and barrel, and we’ll be judged in the election less than two years away.”

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) tried to be the voice of reason, “Our goal, in my opinion, should be not a quick fix. We can do it rapidly — but not a quick fix. We want a long-term solution that lowers costs.”

David Barnes, director of policy engagement at Generation Opportunity, believes the best way to go about repealing and replacing Obamacare should be step-by-step.

“A big reason Obamacare failed is that it’s this one giant omnibus bill,” Barnes said in an interview with Red Alert Politics discussing GenOpp’s targeted approach to health care. “It was 2,7000 pages, covered everything, tried to reform the entire health care sector. I think fundamentally that’s going to be a failed strategy.”

Barnes continued, “Instead, we should do a bunch of little step-by-step bills.”

When asked what will help millennials the most, Barnes said he believes getting rid of Obamacare’s regulations and insurance mandates will greatly benefit young people struggling financially. And the key to all of that is expanding the use of Health Savings Accounts (HSA), which is something Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) advocated for in his plan.

“Instead of putting that money into high premiums,” Barnes said. “Give them a bare bones plan, but they’d be saving money in an HSA. So that 5, 10, 15 years down the road when they start having more health problems themselves, they’d have that money already saved up.”

Listen to the whole conversation below:


Latest Videos