Red Alert Politics has officially merged with the Washington Examiner

Birth Data: Teen pregnancy down 80% since 1991, millennials having kids at older ages

Image via Flickr

Image via RebeccaCV1

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention released their official 2014 birth data, and millennials are getting married and waiting longer to have children but having nearly the same amount as a decade ago.

There were two reports on the subject of birth data, one released on December 23 and a follow up on a month later.

According to the December¬†report there were nearly 3.99 million births in 2014 — a one percent increase from the year before. This was the first time since the great recession in 2007 that the general fertility rate increased.

Teen pregnancy continued to slide — down 80 percent since 1991 — and the amount of unwed mothers also decreased for a sixth straight year. Births by unmarried mothers hit it’s peak in 2009 with 41 percent but has since decreased to 40.2 percent.

Image via CDC

Image via CDC

Millennial also continued the trend of waiting longer to start a family. According to the January report the mean age for first-time mothers hit a historic high of 26.3 continuing a rapid increase since 2009.

The number of women waiting till their early 30’s saw the largest growth as a percentage of the population from 16.5 percent of the population of first-time mothers in 2000 to 21.1 percent in 2014.

Image via CDC

Image via CDC

The average age increased among all racial and ethnic groups, with Asian-American women waiting until they are nearly 30 to have children — the oldest among any racial group, while Native Americans were the youngest.

Image via CDC

Image via CDC

Overall births increased for all states but West Virginia and Hawaii, and among all races except for Native Americans. Non-hispanic whites compromised 53.9 percent of births; Hispanics were 22.9 percent; non-hispanic blacks were 14.8 percent; Asians were 7.1 percent; and Native Americans were 1.1 percent.


Latest Videos