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Iowa caucus: Bernie Sanders wins 80% of youth vote

On nearly Tuesday afternoon, when the results should have been called about 12 hours ago, AP has reported 100% of the votes in for the Democratic Caucus results. Hillary Clinton narrowly beat Bernie Sanders, with 49.9 percent of the vote to his 49.6 percent. Notably missing however was the clear winner sign, like it was for Ted Cruz.

Image via screenshot from Google.

Image via screenshot from Google.

 

Image via screenshot from Google.

Image via screenshot from Google.

A more updated version did not appear until nearly 2:30 in the afternoon.

Image via screenshot from Google.

Image via screenshot from Google.

Some were still referring to it as “uncalled” at the same time.

Image via CNN screenshot.

Image via CNN screenshot.

With that .3 percent difference, she only receives two more delegates than he does, and it’s hardly worth much celebrating. This is especially considering Hillary was considered the winner at times due to a coin toss. Some precincts couldn’t account for caucus goers, and when they couldn’t get it together, that was the suggestion the Democratic Party hotline came up with.

But, while Clinton celebrates her win, there may not be all that much to celebrate. Some will say that Sanders isn’t expected to do well once the primary season has really begun, but a less than certain nomination doesn’t bode well for Hillary in the general. There’s also how Sanders is expected to win N.H. by all accounts, and Iowa certainly isn’t the only state with his key demographic: millennial voters.

Sanders was expected to handily win young voters, in Iowa and on the national level. And at least for last night, he did. The Huffington Post reported on Tuesday what is pretty much the obvious, that “Millennials Turn Out For Iowa Caucus, Heavily Favor Sanders.” 

They point to a CNN entrance poll which shows more than 80 percent of those 17-29 going for Sanders. Hillary enjoyed similar support among those 60 and above, with about 60 percent. But, there’s something different about the younger crowd. And, despite what is predicted, Sanders “said he believes his record will appeal to those older voters in future primary states.”

The Huffington Post spoke with younger voters who came out for Sanders. This includes one who recognizes the fact of the matter that millennials are an unengaged voting bloc:

[Taylor] Patton [a 20-yearold Drake student] said he recognizes the stereotype that millennials don’t vote.

“A lot of people say young people don’t vote and stuff,” Patton said. “But to see everyone here, definitely changes that perspective.”

Time and results will tell if the “chang[ing] that perspective” comes to mean something. But, just the youthful excitement surrounding Sanders thus far led to New York Magazine to write that “The Democrats Effectively Tied in Iowa, But Sanders Won the Future.”

When it comes to the future should Sanders get his way with his tax plan and running the economy, that may not be what millennials actually want. But, it does speak volumes about the Clinton inevitability and the Democratic Party of 2016 and beyond.