Mt. Denali officially recognized by the federal government again and Ohio lawmakers are not happy

FILE - This Aug. 27, 2014 file photo, clearer skies provided this view of one of the faces of North America's tallest peak, Mount McKinley in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. North America's tallest mountain will again be known by its Alaska Native name. President Barack Obama announced Sunday his administration will change the name of Mount McKinley to Denali to honor Athabascans, central Alaska Indians whose territory stretches 500 miles, from the Brooks Range south to Cook Inlet. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer,File)

This Aug. 27, 2014 file photo show Mount McKinley in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. North America’s tallest mountain will again be known by its Alaska Native name. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer,File)

The Obama administration’s decision to recognize the original name of Mount McKinley and officially refer to the mountain as Denali has Ohio politicians in a tizzy.

Since 1917, the federal government has referred to the mountain as McKinley, after Ohioan and 25th president William McKinley. The Alaskan government, however, restored the original name of Denali in 1975.

House Speaker John Boehner said that he was “deeply disappointed in this decision” in a statement.

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) took to Facebook to express his disappointment in the change.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the name change recognizes the native Alaskans in the area and the sacred meaning behind Denali, which is “the great one” in the Athabaskan language, according to The Hill.

Ohio representatives have blocked attempts by Alaskan delegates in the past to restore the name Denali.


Latest Videos