Obama advisor David Plouffe beats out Jay Carney for Uber ‘campaign manager’ job

David Plouffe

Ride-share company Uber has chosen Democratic political consultant and former White House senior advisor David Plouffe to fill the position of senior vice president of policy and strategy for the company.

Plouffe gained notoriety for running Obama’s 2008 campaign, which propelled the president to his first four years in the White House. Uber reportedly also considered former White House press secretary Jay Carney for the job, in addition to Democratic strategist Howard Wolfson.

Uber CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick wrote a blog post to express his excitement at the company’s decision to hire Plouffe.

“Starting in late September, David will be managing all global policy and political activities, communications, and Uber branding efforts,” explained Kalanick. “I will look to him as a strategic partner on all matters as Uber grows around the world. David’s background needs little introduction. He is a proven field general and strategist who built the startup that elected a president.”

He added that Plouffe will “[shepherd] us well beyond the challenges of the Big Taxi cartel, and into the brave new world of software-powered transportation.”

Plouffe also shared a few of his own comments in the post, describing himself as “thrilled” to join the Uber team.

“As Uber succeeds like I believe it can, it will spur the creation of hundreds of thousands of small businesses and directly create millions of jobs; deliver rapid, easy and affordable transportation alternatives to workers, parents, businesses and people out having a good time; make our roads safer, drastically cutting down on drunk and distracted driving; and give those who choose not to purchase an automobile a more viable way to live their lives day to day,” wrote Plouffe.

In an interview with Re/code last May, Kalanick explained that Uber must wage a “political campaign” to take out taxis.

“It’s not Pinterest where people are putting up pins,” said Kalanick. “You’re changing the way cities work, and that’s fundamentally a third rail. We’re in a political campaign, and the candidate is Uber and the opponent is an a–hole named Taxi.”