DNC Chair: I’m not going to confidently predict Democrats take back the House in 2015

Debbie Wasserman-Schultz

The 2014 midterm elections will determine which party controls the United States Congress. And while the GOP is confident it can become the majority party in both chambers, Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz isn’t convinced her party can win back the House.

Rep. Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) sat down with House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and POLITICO’S Jake Sherman for a post-mortem of President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address, which occurred Tuesday night. As talk turned from the president’s annual address to the 2014 midterm elections and who would take control of Congress come 2015, McCarthy said he was confident the GOP would retain control of the House and even become the majority party of the Senate. Wasserman Schultz, however, didn’t exude the same confidence.

“Yes, I do think in 2015, I’m not going to confidently predict that Democrats will take the House back, but what I will predict is that we’re going to pick up seats,” Wasserman Schultz said.

McCarthy, to the contrary, was confident the Republican Party would maintain control of the House of Representatives, even suggesting the GOP would win more seats.

“I think Obamacare comes in three waves. I think voters are going to send a real message. … At the end of the day, the House will end up with more Republicans than we currently have today. And the Senate is at a true play for the majority. It’s actually expanding where it couldn’t before,” he said. “… I think the Senate is up for the majority as well for Republicans to take over.”

One of the major driving factors in turning Congress toward Republican-control, the California Republican said, is the Affordable Care Act. Many Democrats, including Wasserman Schultz, said they planned to run on the president’s signature healthcare law in 2014. However, Obamacare’s disastrous rollout could prove to be a burden for the left rather than a boon.

According to the latest predictions from the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, the Senate remains a toss-up with 49 states predicted to lean toward the Republican candidate. Three states, however, remain in play. The House, according to predictions, will likely stay Republican-controlled.

Listen to Debbie Wasserman Schultz discuss the midterm elections below.