Obama compares healthcare rollout to Civil Rights movement and women’s suffrage

Barack Obama sadPresident Barack Obama made quite the comparison about the challenges of the Affordable Care Act on Wednesday, saying the law’s implementation is similar to the struggles faced during the Civil Rights movement and women’s suffrage.

As part of the White House’s efforts to spread the word about Obamacare, the President addressed a room of Millennials at the White House Youth Summit. Obama outlined what he believed were the benefits of the Affordable Care Act, telling young Americans they have the opportunity to receive coverage, but went on to compare the law’s implementation to the Civil Rights movement and women’s fight for equal rights.

“I hope you haven’t been discouraged by how hard it’s been, because stuff that’s worth it is always hard. The Civil Rights movement was hard. Giving women the right to vote, that was hard. Making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. It’s never been easy for us to change how we do business in this country,” President Obama said.

He continued, noting that providing Americans with health insurance relieves many of a great burden, one that they think about daily.

“And particularly to address needs that a lot of people are worried about one a day-to-day, constant basis. But then suddenly, they’re desperately worried about it when a mishap happens,” Obama said. “This has been the case for social security, for Medicare, for all the great social progress we’ve made in this country.”

The White House Youth Summit is geared to encourage young people to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. The Obama administration has tried desperately to reach out to Millennials, though the President faces an uphill battle.

A recent poll from the Harvard Institute of Politics found that 57 percent of young people disapprove of Obamacare. And in order for the law to succeed, 2.7 million 18- to 35-year olds must register for health insurance through the marketplace. But with the law’s rocky start and a glitch-filled website, whether young people do so remains to be seen.

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