Obama hosts OFA call to fire up supporters, but can’t even fire up himself

Barack Obama pouting sadPresident Barack Obama hosted an Organizing for Action internet call for supporters on Monday night, intending to fire them up about the Affordable Care Act. But the POTUS apparently couldn’t even fire himself up, delivering lackluster, rambling remarks that lasted just over 10 minutes.

During the static-plagued call — which more closely resembled FDR’s crackly fireside chats than anything in the 21st Century — the President called on OFA members to keep fighting for his signature healthcare law. Sounding undeniably discouraged, he thanked them for their support.

“Despite all the noise out there, despite all the criticism, despite all the setbacks that we’ve experienced throughout this process, I’ve never lost faith in our ability to get this done,” he said. “And mainly that’s because of all of you. You guys have lifted me up.”

Obama said he was done campaigning for elected office, but promised that he would push as hard as necessary to see the ACA enacted.

“I’ve got one more campaign in me,” he said, somewhat unconvincingly. “And that’s making sure that this law works.”

The President once again took responsibility for the failed rollout of the online federal healthcare exchange. He promised that HealthCare.gov would be fully operational by its Dec. 1 deadline, but added that the website couldn’t bear the full weight of enrollment.

“What I want to do is make sure that everybody who’s on the phone call understands we’ve always understood that we’re going to have to enroll people by mail, we’re going to have to enroll people over the phone, we’ve going to have to enroll people in person,” he said.

At the end of his chat — after proclaiming he had “talked too long” — the President reiterated his call to action. He said naysayers and critics only serve to give them energy and motivation when one is on “the right side of things.”

“I hope you still have as much fight in you as I do,” he said in a monotone voice.

OFA Executive Director Jon Carson boasted that 200,000 people were on the call, but its not clear how many were actually able to listen to it. Twitter users from across America complained that they were unable to get the online-only call.

The call was meant, ironically, to galvanize Obama supporters after the failed rollout of another online venture – the healthcare website.