This Philadelphia man has a serious appreciation of small currency

US10dollarbill-Series_2004A“The dollar is dead!” many shout in fear as the Federal Reserve prints cash like a newspaper press on Printing Enhanced Drugs (PEDs). Tell that to a Philadelphia money collector whose appreciation of small currency is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Billy Baeder, a car repair shop owner by day and a currency collector and dealer by trade from Royersford, Pa., outside Philadelphia, is in possession of a 1933 $10 note that one auctioneer informally values at $500,000. That would make this ‘Silver Certificate’ possibly the most valuable piece of currency printed since 1929, Philly.com reports.

“This is legit. It’s very legit,” Michael Abramson, a fellow dealer of Baeder’s, said of the note. Abramson himself possesses a 1966 $100 ‘Legal Tender’ note that is listed for $495,000, making it the chief competition to the most effectively disguised retirement plan in American history.

What makes bills such as Baeder’s so valuable are unique serial numbers: low ones (Baeder’s ancient $10 note has a number of ‘A00000001A’), those that read the same backward and forward, those that climb up or down incrementally like a ‘ladder’, or other quirky combinations of digits.

What makes bills such as Baeder’s so relevant to the common man is that they often are attainable by good fortune. For instance, he recently paid a woman $2,000 for a $1 bill with the serial number ‘00000001’ she got in change from Walmart.

So keep in mind, folks, during these trying times of economic malaise: looking for a way to make a quick buck can turn into thousands.

Not necessarily for Baeder, though, who views his $10-in-name-only prize as priceless.

“If someone came to me and wanted to give me $500,000 for it, I would not sell it,” Baeder said.

(h/t Philly.com)

 

Comments