Rasmussen: Americans would rather see government shutdown than Obamacare funded

U.S. CapitolA majority of Americans prefer that the government go through a partial shutdown to cut funding for Obamacare, according to a new study by Rasmussen Reports. 

The study, which was released Tuesday, found that 51 percent of likely voters nationwide would rather see the government partially shut down when the current continuing resolution expires on September 30 than keep the president’s healthcare law funded at its current levels. Four in ten likely voters believe that we should avoid a government showdown by funding Obamacare at its current levels.

Included in the 51 percent of likely voters that would support the partial government shutdown are 57 percent of Independents and 78 percent of Republicans, as well as 61 percent of likely voters who have family in the military.

In addition, 53 percent of likely voters support a partial shutdown of the federal government so both parties can agree on what spending cuts to make. That includes 52 percent of Millennials, 62 percent of Independents and 59 percent of those who have family in the military.

Passing a continuing resolution by the end of the month is a top priority for Congress, however Congressional Republicans are split on whether or not to shut down the government over Obamacare. Several Tea Party senators including Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky have said that they will support a government shutdown, while House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia is firmly against the government shutdown.

President Obama’s signature legislative act remains widely unpopular among the American electorate. A NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released Sunday found that 44 percent of Americans consider Obamacare to be a bad idea and roughly the same believe that it will have a negative impact on the country’s healthcare system.

Millennials in particular aren’t thrilled about the looming implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well. Just one in ten young Americans definitely plan on enrolling in the program’s healthcare exchanges in January according to a study released earlier this month by The Morning Consult.

Unfortunately for the president, the viability of the healthcare exchanges is dependent upon having a significant number of Millennials enrolled in the program to offset the costs of older Americans, who generally need more care than younger ones. To that end, the Obama administration and the Department of Health and Human Services has gone out of its way to recruit professional athletes and celebrities to convince Millennials to join the healthcare exchanges, but has seen little success thus far.

Rasmussen Reports conducted a telephone study of 1,000 likely voters nationwide September 14-15, 2013. The margin of error for the study is +/- 3 percent at a 95 percent confidence level.