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Alabama Senate votes to ignore new federal gun laws that violate Second Amendment

gunIn the wake of the U.S. Senate’s failed background check legislation, the Alabama legislature is one step closer to passing its own gun bill — to prevent any new federal gun control laws from infringing on Alabamians’ right to bear arms.

The Alabama state Senate voted, 24-6, on Tuesday to approve a piece of legislation that would prohibit federal gun control laws from being upheld in the state if those laws are deemed a “violation of the Second Amendment.”

“They are not going to use our law enforcement resources to enforce their law that we believe is unconstitutional,” state Sen. Paul Sanford (R-Madison), the bill’s author, said during the debate. Sanford introduced the bill after receiving hundreds of phone calls and emails from constituents, he told Red Alert Politics.

Along with Sanford, the “Second Amendment Preservation Act” was co-sponsored by state Sens. Scott Beason (R-Blount, Jefferson, St. Clair), Shadrack McGill (R-DeKalb, Jackson, Madison), Clay Scofield (R-Blount, Madison, Marshall) and Tom Whatley (R-Lee, Russell, Tallapoosa).

The bill also includes a finding of the legislature that states “All federal acts, laws, orders, rules or regulations regarding firearms are a violation of the Second Amendment.” It was not Sanford’s intention, however, to nullify all federally-imposed gun laws.

“My intent right now is not to go back and try to roll back every federal single federal [gun] law,” he told Red Alert.

The state Senator said he wanted to give the Alabama attorney general the ability to issue a federal gun law unconstitutional, thereby allowing law enforcement to ignore the law.

Though it passed the Senate with ease, the bill would still need approval in the state House of Representatives and the governor’s signature to become law. And with only four days left of the current legislative session, it might be hard to pass the bill. But if the bill doesn’t come to a vote on the House floor, Sanford said he would reintroduce the bill in the next legislative session, where he predicted it would have a good shot.

“We’re really partial to our Second Amendment here, so I think it has a good chance of passing the House,” he said.”


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