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Spin Masters: New book explains how media bias helped re-elect Obama

The days of young people graduating from college and starting their exciting careers are over, according to Washington Examiner editorial page editor David Freddoso.

“We think of people between the ages 25 and 54 as being in the heart of their careers,” Freddoso writes in his new book, Spin Masters: How the Media Ignored the Real News and Helped Reelect Barack Obama. “It’s the period where you take your first job in the field that interests you … You start a family and you buy your first home … you establish your complete independence from your parents.”

But, Freddoso argues, “In the Obama recovery, those days are over.”

This is just one of the stories, highlighted in Freddoso’s book, that was shuffled under the rug by the mainstream media during the 2012 presidential election. Major news outlets reported that the job market was in recovery under the Obama administration, but Freddoso points out that there was zero job recovery in this particular demographic.

“People who should be building their lives now are sitting at home playing their video games,” Freddoso said during an event at the Heritage Foundation in Washington D.C. on Tuesday. ”Hopefully, they’re trying to find a job or something, but they’re probably collecting unemployment benefits.”

Despite these grim statistics, Obama still won the majority of the youth vote in the 2012 election.

Freddoso argues that liberal media bias may have played a part in this outcome, but also says that college students can be “shielded of the results of a bad economy, to some degree.”

“You’re far less likely to be hit by the ineffective economic policies the Obama administration has put into effect,” he explained.

The media’s portrayal of Obama’s so-called recovery is just one example of its inherent bias, according to Freddoso.

He first decided to write “Spin Masters” after the media decided to focus more on Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s gaffe about the Benghazi attack than the actual attack.

“You saw a story about foreign policy failure get turned into a story about a Mitt Romney gaffe,” he told Red Alert Politics.

Freddoso predicts the liberal media bias isn’t going away anytime soon, but still urges conservatives to not “lose faith about the ideas that work in the real world.”

“You just have to get better expressing them and understanding them,” he said. “That’s how to overcome liberal media bias in the long term.”