Rand Paul introduces National Right-to-Work Act

Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) introduced legislation last week that would create a national right-to-work law stripping all unions of their collective bargaining rights.

Sen. Paul’s bill, which already has 10 cosponsors, doesn’t actually add language to any existing federal laws. Instead, it removes all existing forced unionism provisions currently in federal laws.

“Every American worker deserves the right to freedom of association – and I am concerned that the 26 states that allow forced union membership and dues infringes on these workers’ rights,” Sen. Paul said in a statement last week. “Right to work laws ensure that all Americans are given the choice to refrain from joining or paying dues to a union as a condition for employment. Nearly 80 percent of all Americans support the principles and so I have introduced a national Right to Work Act that will require all states to give their workers the freedom to choose.”

Mark Mix, president of the National Right to Work Committee, commented in an email to the press that, “We’re extremely pleased that Senator Paul has introduced the National Right to Work Act, intensifying a growing debate about labor law and worker freedom in our country.”

Forced unionism is still legal in 26 states, including the battleground states of Colorado, Ohio and Pennsylvania. While there have been other similar bills introduced in recent years, including one by former Senator Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) in 2011, Paul and his cosponsors are hoping that the momentum is in their favor, especially after both Michigan and Indiana became right-to-work states in the past two years.

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