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N.J. Gov. Chris Christie blames Boehner and “toxic politics of Congress” for no-vote on Sandy bill

If you thought Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) was upset about the House not voting on the Sandy aid package, you ain’t seen nothing yet. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has him beat by a mile.

During a press conference on Wednesday afternoon, Christie railed against Speaker of the House John Boehner and the members of Congress who put politics above what matters to their constituents — in this case, an aid bill for victims of Hurricane Sandy.

“Last night, politics was placed before our oath to serve our citizens,” Christie said. “For me, it was disappointing and disgusting to watch.”

The New Jersey Governor said he had been given assurances that the bill would come to a vote. Instead, it was pulled late Tuesday night and Christie said he had not been given any logical reason why. Christie said once he was notified of the situation, he attempted to call Boehner, but was unable to reach him.

“The Speaker was trying to prove something against somebody else,” Christie said. “I hope he’s achieved it.”

When asked about the reported absence of information about the bill or the rumor of it including ‘pork,’ Christie denied it. “Completely ridiculous,” he said. Christie claimed that the lack of a vote on the bill had nothing to do with him, but was the result of “toxic” and “internal” politics. He refused to even address the subject of the Tea Party, but went so far as to call the fiscal cliff “fake.” He bristled when a reporter called the fiscal cliff negotiations a “huge, epic battle.”

During the press conference, Christie also expressed his support of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, with whom he had been working closely. The Christie-Cantor ‘bromance’ had some speculating that Christie was priming Cantor to oust Boehner as Speaker when he comes up for re-election.

Christie’s remarks come on the heels of his joint statement with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo earlier on Wednesday, calling the House’s no-vote a “dereliction of duty.”


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