History professor demands NRA CEO’s “head on a stick”

A history professor at the University of Rhode Island who called for the murder of National Rifle Association President (NRA) CEO Wayne LaPierre Friday is baffled by conservative online publication Campus Reform’s decision to report on his inappropriate tweets today.

Erik Loomis, an assistant professor of history at the University of Rhode Island, posted a series of angry tweets directed at the NRA and LaPierre in the wake of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School Friday.

While he was calling for an end to gun violence, his tweets turned violent when he called for LaPierre’s “head on a stick”.

But it doesn’t look like Loomis is having any tweeter’s remorse, and all of his tweets shooting down the NRA are still available to the public.

Loomis not only blamed LaPierre for the shooting in Newtown, Conn., but Republicans everywhere. He proceeded to send multiple tweets dropping the F-bomb directed at the GOP, LaPierre and the NRA.

And while Americans mourned the death of 20 children and six faculty, Loomis advocated immediately politicizing this heart-breaking tragedy in another vulgar tweet containing the f-word.

Besides demanding the beheading of the NRA CEO and turning the organization into a scapegoat for the Sandy Hook shooting, Loomis also deemed the NRA a terrorist group.

After Campus Reform, a blog for conservative college students ran by the Leadership Institute, brought Loomis’ tweets to light, rather than apologize for his crude language, he attacked the article’s author, calling him a “David Horowitz wannabe.”

According to the University of Rhode Island’s website, diversity is “stimulated by student, staff and faculty advocacy.” Apparently not.

Correction: We previously incorrectly stated that Loomis could be fired for his hate speech towards the NRA and that it could also affect his ability to get tenure. According to a spokesperson for The FIRE that is not the case and Loomis can neither be fired nor rejected tenure for his inappropriate statements.

Comments

Comments

  1. stephen a schmidt says:

    MR. Loomis, I find your comments to be despicable. for A person of your alleged intelligence I find you to be a poor mentor to young people. The college students that brought your tweets to light should be teaching you.

  2. Timb says:

    You think a person should fired for “foul language”?

    Explain to me again how the only Amendment conservatives like is the Second. ‘Cause that First one really asks you off

    1. Sarah Muro says:

      There is a difference between foul language and calling for the murder of someone.

      1. Victoria says:

        Exactly Sarah! This foolish man called for the murder of a man. And should be treated as a criminal that he is. If I were LaPierre I would report this man to authorities and make an example of him.

        It’s almost a little funny how violent liberals and progressives are, but people who support gun ownership are suppose to be the dangerous people.

    2. blue sky says:

      First, you can be legally fired for your actions (including speech) that take place outside the confines or scope of your employment. Second, once the constitution becomes maleable (e.g. restrictions on the 2A) then the next logical step is for all of the rights contained within it to become equally maleable. Say, no political speech attacking the administration in power for 60 days prior to an election? It can’t happen? It can’t until it does. We conservatives seek the preservation of our constitutional rights (including the second amendment) because we know that a government that has the power to restrict or otherwise negate one right, will soon seize the power to restrict them all.

      1. Ashley says:

        Well said, blue sky. However it bears reminding that the founders made very clear that the basic human rights specified and protected by those amendments to the constitution, and collectively referred to as ‘The Bill of Rights'; were inherent to all humanity, and not subject to any suborcination to the whim or direction of any ruler or governing body. They were and are most properly referred to as ‘constitutionally protected’ rights.

  3. revolutionary says:

    I dont think calling for someones head on a stick necessarily qualifies as calling for their murder.. that being said he should know better he is a teacher and he should realize the power that he holds as a teacher to persuade students in their way of thinking, and probably should have refrained from saying anything. That still does not justify him being fired for what he said.

    1. Jerry O'Neal says:

      Calling for Wayne LaPierre head on a stick qualifies Erik Loomis for the same help the killer in the school needed, both sick and stupid.

    2. Francesca Chambers Francesca Chambers says:

      For the record, at no time did we ever say he should be fired. We simply said that because he does not have tenure he could be fired, so making statements like that are not smart. What was updated in the piece was simply that he could not be fired for his statements regardless of his work status because the First Amendment protects this kind of speech. Please don’t misrepresent our position this issue.

  4. Jim Dandy says:

    A guy like this would obviously teach completely to the left and offer a one-sided view to his students. It’s outrageous.

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