Gay marriage, conservatism and the role of the judiciary

The Supreme Court’s announcement that it will consider a pair of gay marriage cases this term puts conservatives in a tough spot.

On the one hand, same-sex marriage is clearly gaining political traction nationwide, with voters in Maryland and Maine both endorsing the practice in 2012 after years of rejection at the ballot box. Last weekend the first gay marriage was held in Washington state after voters approved the policy via referendum on Election Day.

On the other hand, certain outcomes in the cases would be devastating to conservative notions of the role of the judiciary and the federal government.

Although the GOP is largely staying silent about the cases, the party could educate Americans on the proper role of the judiciary without being hostile to gay rights by consistently applying conservative judicial principals to both cases.

For example, conservatives would be wise to embrace the case challenging President Bill Clinton’s 1996 Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), U.S. v. Windsor.  In that case, the plaintiffs are asking the Court to rule that Section 3 of DOMA violates the Fifth Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection of the law because it denies marriage recognition to gay couples who are legally married under state law.

One of the central themes of the challenge to DOMA is the notion that the states should, and historically always have, exercised full authority to dictate the terms of domestic law within their borders.  As the Second Circuit points out, “DOMA is an unprecedented breach of longstanding deference to federalism.”  True commitment to the Tenth Amendment means allowing states to experiment unimpeded with their laws and institutions, including marriage.

Conversely, the case that may overturn California’s Proposition 8, Hollingsworth v. Perry, is particularly troubling. In that case, the lower court held that because the California‘s Supreme Court previously established gay marriage, taking that court-granted right away from gay citizens through a voter-approved constitutional referendum ( Prop. 8 ) violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

In simpler terms, at issue is whether the legal views of a handful of unelected judges can effectively become permanent law, even against the will of millions of voters who wish to amend their state’s constitution specifically to overrule those judges’ opinions.  It’s hard to imagine a legal ruling more offensive to the notion of checks and balances or utterly adverse to the democratic process. Even ardent pro-gay rights activists should shudder at that kind of judicial precedent.

Conservatives should be consistent in their justifications for judicial outcomes and point out the various inconsistencies on the Left.

For example, equal protection under the law is imperative to the Left in the gay marriage context, but entirely ignored when racial distinctions are used in college admissions (also under consideration by the Supreme Court this term).  Federalism is God’s gift to the Constitution when DOMA is at issue, but Obamacare’s state coercion on Medicaid is apparently an acceptable intrusion on states’ rights.  And finally, the First Amendment is generally considered sacrosanct, except when free speech is exercised by certain disfavored speakers like corporations (even non-profits) or religious entities.

Republicans are right to feel the need to moderate on gay-rights, especially when it’s obvious that gay marriage referendums will likely continue to be approved by voters in states throughout the Union.  Indeed, the GOP barely made a peep when “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” was repealed or when President Obama announced his final “evolution” on the issue of gay marriage.

However, moderation on gay marriage should not prevent the GOP from staging a principled defense of conservative judicial principles. Gay marriage will end up legal in California within a few years regardless of what the Supreme Court does this term. Poor judicial precedent, on the other hand, may take generations to fix.

 

Comments

Comments

  1. theo mckinney says:

    4 REASONS

    It used to be legal to maim/torture/exile/murder gay couples out of fairness and equality.

    Arrests were finally made amongst the antigay lynch mobs and vigilantes, cases went to court, and “unpopular” citizens’ civil rights were gradually recognized or restored as the Constitution stepped in to finally identify those odious ways as 100% illegal, too.

    “No more bodily harm to LGBT citizens just to be mean” said the US Constitution every time it was asked. “people who try are to be considered ‘unlawful’.”

    “Equality and justice for all.”

    “Even the so-called *icky* Gay people”.

    Once it was discovered in Hawaii that marriage equality was clearly implicit to state constitutional law (without a ban of some sort edited in –long after the fact); this was when today’s fad for creating animus-driven -and/or a new “religious” inspired practice of gay human psychological/virtual “sacrifices” (In the Name of God, yet), was born:

    Another more thinly-veiled psychological attack on innocent gay citizens, now that the physical sorts of antigay attacks are being outlawed, even on school playgrounds.

    Believe it or not, there are some “church” factions bemoaning their growing inability to justify bullying innocent gay children under the color of school authority anymore. They call this turn of events “a problem”.

    I call that deranged. Only some Satan diety, if there is such a thing, could take delight in supporting such “ideals”.

    God seems to be on the side who speak the truth under oath; the very same ones who got the rainbow, too. And the couples who know deeply what “love, no matter what” might mean.

    ““““
    Unfortunately, the mechanics of checks and balances initially ALWAYS favors “laws”, good or bad which might be voted in by people, up until that laws is proven more harmful than benificent.

    On passing Federal Constitutional muster: if a “bad law” voted in by ballot has no validly recognized effect on the issue it was designed to remedy, yet harms certain innocent people –but not others- while it exists, that “law” must be stricken.

    DOMA has been failing on this count consistently. Ten times now.

    This is no accident.

    Meanwhile, in the initial federal ruling gutting CA’s ban, now court precedent, the judge shows four reasons, any one of which would kill such bad “law”-making as one of these “constitutional” (lol) marriage bans.

    Four separate and distinct litmus tests used to determine ACTUAL “Constitutionality”, and CA’s illegal Proposition 8 failed all of them.

    Because irrational law-making is illegal and marriage bans are, by all federal court accounts so far, illegal and irrational and cannot stand as “law” once challenged.

    Fact.

Polititainment

Stewart wants to move 'home' to England

Jon Stewart is having second thoughts about the whole “American independence from Britain” thing.

Colbert: Obama is stealing Bush's lines

Colbert observed Monday night that some of Obama's recent comments on ISIS and Iraq seem a little familiar.

Liberal lobbying firm makes ‘Bibi-Yoncé’

If you’ve ever thought that the complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict reminded you a lot of a Beyoncé song, liberal Middle East lobbying group J Street has the internet campaign for you!

Bush's cool reaction to 'Scandal'

Judy Smith, former special assistant and deputy press secretary to President George H.W. Bush and inspiration for "Scandal" main character Olivia Pope, spoke to an art and commerce conference Friday about Bush's reaction to the storyline of the ABC series.

Actress wants more female politicians

In an interview with Politico, Davis spotlighted a recently released study that found only 10 percent of politicians in films in the world are played by female actors, which was completed in part by the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media.

White House

Holder resigns with 26 percent approval rating, making him third least popular Obama cabinet member

Attorney General Eric Holder’s dismal 26 percent approval rating as he steps down from his duties still leaves him as only the third least popular Obama administration official to resign.

Barack Obama doesn’t celebrate National Coffee Day. He celebrates tee time.

Look. We get it. The president gave his coffee salute, The Semper Latte, just days ago, recent enough to use for National Coffee Day jokes from dusk 'til decaf. But aren't we missing an opportunity here?

U.S. Grants $450M to Community Colleges To Link Job Training To Employers
WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden announced almost a half-billion dollars of grants Monday to community colleges working with employers on job training. Linking training to industry demand is key to the Obama administration’s strategy for improving wages and reducing unemployment. Massasoit Community College in Massachusetts and Wisconsin’s Chippewa Valley Technical College received the […]
WH: Secret Service’s ‘task is incredible’
THE HILL – The White House said Sunday it remained confident in the Secret Service despite news that the agency didn’t realize for five days that bullets had hit the White House in a 2011 shooting incident. “I know the Secret Service is on top of this and they will take every necessary step to correct […]
Even hardcore left states don’t believe Obama is doing a good job
President Obama is facing more bad approval ratings, but this time they are coming from states that used to be his biggest fans. Just 39 percent of registered voters in New York responded to a new Marist College poll that they believed Obama was doing an “excellent” or “good” job. This is the lowest level […]

Congress

McCain: Rand Paul 'trusts me' in military matters

McCain thinks he would wield a great deal of influence over a potential President Paul, “particularly on the military side of things.”

Rep introduces bill to ban porn on gov. computers
Most people wouldn’t think to browse porn at work, but then again, most people aren’t federal employees. Earlier this year it was discovered that one EPA official had been browsing pornography for two to six hours a day while at work and now Rep. Mark Meadows, (R-N.C.) has introduced a bill explicitly “prohibit[ing] the access […]
DWS repeated 'back of his hand' line
Apparently when Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz finds a phrase she likes she is going to repeat it, no matter how offensive. For the second time within the past month, footage of the DNC chairwoman has surfaced in which she accused a Republican governor of giving women “the back of his hand.” Republican Super […]
Twitter squashes Schumer's tribute to Eric Holder

One could see how Schumer's simile may have been a stretch. Twitter certainly did.

Lawmakers take in $608 per hour for time in D.C.
THE HILL – Congress will be in session for only eight days during a 102-day span between Aug. 1 and Nov. 12, when lawmakers are set to return for a lame-duck session after the elections. Because the annual salary for members of the House is $174,000, their hourly wage for those eight days amounts to $608 […]