Pew Research: Hispanic Electorate set to double by 2030

If you thought the Latino vote played a huge role in the results of this election, just wait 20 years.

The number of Hispanics eligible to vote is set to double by 2030, according to Pew Hispanic Center analysis based on U.S. Census Bureau data, Election Day exit polls and a new nationwide survey of Hispanic immigrants.

The hispanic share of the electorate is set to rise mainly because Hispanics are one of the youngest ethnic groups in the United States. Currently, 17 percent of U.S. citizens are Hispanic but they made up only 10 percent of the electorate in 2012.

“Their median age is 27 years—and just 18 years among native-born Hispanics—compared with 42 years for that of white non-Hispanics,” the research said. “In the coming decades, their share of the age-eligible electorate will rise markedly through generational replacement alone.”Hi

They are calling it the “Awakened Giant,” that is set to dynamically change the demographics of the U.S. in just a short time.

The Hispanic electorate will account for 40 percent of the growth of the electorate from now until 2030 and the research predicts 40 million Hispanics will be eligible to vote in 2030.

The data is not accounting, at this time, for the rates of naturalization to increase because of comprehensive immigration reform and Dream Act initiatives that are being proposed in Congress.

If those reforms go through, the number of eligible Hispanic voters could surge even higher, the research said.

The numbers also depend on the rate of Hispanic immigration to the U.S. which has decreased in recent years.

Despite these variables, the numbers are almost guaranteed to be high enough to determine an election, if they are not there already.

What it means is that there is no longer an excuse for either party to ignore or marginalize the Hispanic vote, because, whether they like it or not, massive numbers of Hispanics will be voting in the upcoming years and losing their votes could very well mean losing an election.