Three ways the GOP can reach out to Latino voters

President Barack Obama won the election with the help of the Hispanic vote, which went more disproportionately for Obama than any other ethnic group other than African Americans.

The GOP made more efforts to reach out to Latinos in 2012 than in 2008, but the Republican Party’s measures were weak. The GOP spent 2012 scrambling to catch up with the Democrats’ well-thought out Hispanic outreach campaign and the party talked about issues that, frankly, don’t appeal to the majority of Latinos at all.

The Hispanic, and yes, legal Hispanic, population is growing exponentially in the United States. According to the 2010 census, more than 25 percent of Americans between the ages of 19 and 35 are hispanic.

If a Dream Act is passed in Congress that provides a pathway to citizenship, it will only serve to increase the number of Hispanics who will legally be able to vote in 2016.

If the Republican Party fails to attract Latino voters, it will lose such a large portion of the electorate that it may never win another election.

Ever.

The GOP needs to realize that it does have ways it can appeal to Latino voters without abandoning conservative values. This can be done in three major ways:

1. Put together a coherent plan on immigration – It has been said before but it needs to be re-emphasized. The United States needs a plan on immigration that makes sense, that respects the value of human life and that will bring economic stability to America. Republicans need to come up with a system that will reduce, if not get rid of, illegal immigration while promoting the same kind of legal immigration that made it possible for America to succeed in the first place.

2. Pose serious solutions for illegal hispanics already living in the United States – An estimated 11 million illegal immigrants live in the United States, according to the Department of Homeland Security. We are talking about a group of people  larger than the entire populations of Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada combined. To insist on immediate deportation of this incredible number of people, some of whom have lived in the United States from infancy, would be simply un-American, not to mention impossible. This is not to say that the U.S. in any way needs to offer amnesty to illegal immigrants, but they need to offer a path to citizenship, like the one often championed by Senator Marco Rubio (R – Fl.), so that immigrants who are willing to work hard and become citizens, have that opportunity.

3. Boost underfunded Hispanic conservative groups – The GOP has strong conservative think-tanks and action groups, but the movement doesn’t do enough to boost their Hispanic or spanish-language sections. If the Republican party hopes to win over Latino voters, information about what it means to be a conservative is available to Hispanic immigrants who, so far, have only been spoon-fed Left-wing ideas. Major conservative organizations need to take the lead and devote more money, time and energy into increasing the reach of these great initiatives.

Whether the GOP is willing to admit it or not, the demographics of the United States are changing and if political platforms refuse to adapt, they will be left in the dust.

Comments

Comments

  1. @DiscardedVirtues says:

    Agree that the GOP needs to do a better job of being inclusive. Entrenched party leadership is strangling the party’s future with internal power politics, perhaps fatally. Some leaders involved the party are primarily in this for the money, and they need to go.

    I agree that we also have work to do on immigration. But I would place emphasis on putting our nation’s interests first. No one seems to know what that means; we need a national dialogue on that.

    I tend to disagree on the rest. The Republicans believe themselves to be the party of this nation’s original, constitutional values, but have moved so far away from them that they cannot muster a decent consensus on the few critical principles that should drive a shared vision of America. The party fiddles with social legislation just as the liberals do, without realizing that being true to the values of our founders would mean that our nation should refrain from federal government involvement in social issues. Because of this key failure, the GOP is no longer sufficiently different from the liberals. It cannot promise a dramatically different future to a voting public, because it does not behave as though it would commit to one. The GOP seems to have lost faith in freedom, and this makes them no different from their opponents.

    This is a critical inconsistency, and it is seen and understood by many who oppose the party. Many people in this country know that we are in trouble. They would respond to a message that says we must fundamentally change our ways if we want our lives to improve. People are hungry for leadership willing to do the right things. But this lack of commitment to principle is one of the biggest reasons for the GOP failure in the presidential election just completed. It is not possible to simultaneously lead on principle, and at the same time try to make concessions on those principles to appease key special interest groups.

    It is time for real, principled leadership, if we are to have the chance to avoid the storm that awaits the complete failure of our current policies and our economy.

  2. Evangelina says:

    I believe this to be true for some people, or better said for most hispanics. Unfortunately, the majority of hispanics have put “legalization”, above saving the lives of the unborn. Is it because of selfishness or ignorance? that’s unknown. But, it’s more than obvious that a baby in the womb of his/her mother is a human being, and having “papers” should never be more important than a life. I was born in a small town of Guanajuato, Mexico; I was brought to the U.S. when I was 12 years old. And yes, I am an illegal alien. I qualify for the law that president Obama recently passed for young undocumented immigrants. But, that would never make me doubt that what I believe and stand for is: in the right to live for every human person.I am 100% against the laws that permit the killings of millions of babies, not only in this country, but in other nations as well. If I had to choose, between getting deported to Mexico while putting an end to abortions in this country, or becomming legalized while approving and supporting evil actions, such as: talking about and taking action on aborting millions of babies and making it sound as if it was fine to do it, as we saw during the Democratic Convention for support of president Obama’s candidacy; I would, without a doubt! Choose Life for the unborn, whom are, the real innocent Ones.
    I do not reject the idea of amnesty for undocummented people like me, but I do choose Life over “papers”, regardless of the consequences that this position might bring me; because Life is priceless.

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