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7-Eleven’s coffee cup poll correctly predicts Obama’s reelection

While many national polls and political pundits predicted a win for GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, a significantly less scientific public opinion tally correctly called a win for President Barack Obama.

The national convenience store chain 7-Eleven held its fourth 7-Election presidential campaign coffee cup poll — and following Obama’s win on Tuesday its record is four for four. The President won 59 percent of cup “votes,” with Romney capturing the remaining 41 percent, according to the 7-Election website.

Between Sept. 6 and Election Day, patrons of 7-Eleven stores across the country could “cast a vote” for the presidential candidate of their choice, by purchasing their coffee in a red, Romney cup or a blue, Obama cup. There was also the option of using a regular green 7-Eleven cup for those who wished to remain nonpartisan.

The current President was leading the coffee cup poll from the very beginning, and all throughout the contest, but his lead slipped to 15 percentage points following his poor showing in the first presidential debate, according to a 7-Eleven press release. After the other three debates, Obama’s lead increased again, but ‘Mittmentum’ cut that lead down to 12.8 percentage points in the days following the third debate. The arrival of Hurricane Sandy once again increased the President’s lead, and he stood 17 percentage points above his GOP challenger the day before the election.

Obama secured 50.4 percent of the votes in the actual presidential election, compared to Romney’s 48.0 percent, according to Real Clear Politics. The difference between the real percentages and the 7-Election polling can be explained by the fact that more 7-Eleven stores are in urban and suburban areas, which are generally more Democrat-heavy, and fewer stores are in rural areas, which tend to be more Republican.

Even though 7-Election is openly unscientific, it might be time for political commentators to pay attention to a public poll that has an accuracy rating of 100 percent over four tough-to-call presidential elections.