New, False Claims of Black Voter Intimidation Sparked by Far Left

Voter ID laws and voter fraud have been a hot topic and intense subject of debate across the country lately. Supporters of voter ID laws are firm believers that it will tackle the issue of voter fraud, which includes but is not limited to dead persons present on registration lists, ballot stuffing, tampering with electronic voting machines, etc. The chorus of opponents of voter ID law have been consistent in vocalizing their opinion that voter ID laws disenfranchise minorities, the elderly, and the youth.

And the opponents of Voter ID laws are now citing a weak example of “voter intimidation” from  the Wisconsin recall election back in June where a black woman claims she was “watched” by white election observers.

Catherine Engelbrecht, founder of True The Vote, a Texas-based non-profit organization that combats voter fraud and irregularities, stressed the importance of realizing that fair elections are symbolic of national unity. “There is a disconnect between what the voters want and what the politicians want,” Engelbrecht said. “A confident, engaged electorate leads to a united America.”

Two days ago, an article in the Tucson Sentinel attempted to arouse an emotional response to the voter ID law conversation by invoking a notion that there was voter intimidation in the Wisconsin governor recall election back in June. AJ Vicens and Natasha Khan recounted the story of Jamila Gatlin, an African-American voter who expressed curiosity and intimidation of white “election observers” representing True the Vote, at the polls. Gatlin retorted, “That’s pretty harassing right there, if you ask me. Why do we have to be watched while we vote?”

While this article is a deliberate attempt to promote voter ID activists as individuals who are seeking to suppress minorities, this is nothing but a fabricated myth. Not to mention, having people “observe” the voting process isn’t real intimidation – the Black Panther Party waving knight sticks outside a polling station in Pennsylvania constitutes real voter intimidation.

Former Democratic Rep. Arthur Davis, an African-American from Alabama, debunked this myth in its entirety. “It’s not that this process is being used to favor white candidates in these communities over black candidates, or vice versa,” he said. “It’s African-American candidates running against African-American candidates.”

In order to ensure that voting is free and fair, the observation of activity is necessary. It ensures that each individual, regardless of race, is experiencing the freedom to exercise their vote without fear of illegal activity stripping them of that freedom.

It also creates an unnecessary atmosphere of paranoia. The perception that white election observers are only watching black voters is lunacy. It is nothing more than a tactic of class warfare and division that would only set America backward and not forward.

The article also goes on further to note that about 100 minority protestors—black and Hispanic—were present at an anti-voter ID law rally earlier in the year. One of the protestors, Terry O’Rourke, a TX attorney, gave in to the racial polarization cheered on by the Left regarding this issue. “You don’t have to beat up people up or chain them to keep them from voting,” the attorney said.

This is eerily similar to the controversial and racially tinged “chains” remark VP Joe Biden said in regards to Mitt Romney.

Americans must continue to denounce this rhetoric that is causing racial tensions. The Left simply uses this mechanism because it appeals to emotions and sensitivity. It is a baseless claim, and quite frankly, insults the individuals that liberals claim to represent and defend.

The more the Left becomes exposed in their racial bigotry, the more Americans will become aware of their deceit and ignorance.

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