Rep. Tim Scott: Republicans Will Double Percentage Of Black Vote From 2008

Rep. Tim Scott (R- S.C.) was on CNN last night with Wolf Blitzer making predictions about the black vote and what it means for Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney. Scott believes the outlook is positive for Republicans to gain more black votes this presidential election compared to 2008.

Romney created a stir yesterday when he addressed the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and received mixed reviews as he got a standing ovation after being booed in the same speech.

Typically Democrats have locked up the black vote, as President Barack Obama did in 2008.  President Obama won 95 percent of the black vote compared to Sen. John McCain’s (R-Ariz.) 4 percent.

Scott said this fall is a prime opportunity for Republicans to at least double the percentage of the black vote for Romney.

“I think it is realistic he will get close to 10 percent of the African-American vote,” Scott said. “I will start by being one of the 10 percent.”

Scott said that because black voters were hit disproportionately hard by the economic downturn, much of the luster of voting for President Obama again is gone in the black community.

“What we’re looking at from a Romney perspective, the fact that African-American unemployment since 2008 is up 40 percent.  40 percent.  Home closures, 25 percent.  So what we have is the same message that works for the rest of America, works for the black community, too.”

Scott also alluded to how African-Americans should be engaged and listening to Romney, because he shares the same concerns as the black community.

“He addressed two important issues in the African-American community. First, the joblessness. Huge. Among young folks in the black community, almost 40 percent. And he addressed the symptom, which is joblessness rate as well as the problem, which is the educational outcome.”

Scott said that Romney should get some credit “just for showing up,” as the NAACP has typically been the lion’s den for Republican politicians looking to address the group.

President George W. Bush also addressed the NAACP back in 2006.

However, President Obama was absent from speaking before the group, and sent Vice President Joe Biden today to instead speak in his place.

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