Obama adviser David Plouffe flip-flops on the issue of tax cuts

White House adviser David Plouffe seemed to want it both ways on the Bush tax cuts during a series of appearances on the Sunday talk shows.

Appearing on NBC’s Meet the Press with David Gregory, Plouffe contended that President Obama “lowered taxes” and wants to “sign a permanent extension of the Bush tax cuts for the middle class.”

Plouffe tried to have it both ways, contrasting the president’s newfound support of the Bush tax cuts with current Republican policy proposals, saying, “they led us to the great recession in the first place.”

When asked by Gregory if taxes would have to go up if Obama wins the election, Plouffe said tax increases would be necessary.

Gregory then pressed Plouffe on Obama’s economic record, asking him why the country should support four more years of failed Obama policies that clearly have not worked.

Plouffe immediately attempted to shift blame for the president’ failed record, attributing the lack of recovery to continuing effects from the recession that the country was facing when Obama took office.

He then attempted another jab towards Republicans, insisting that the recession was, “caused by the same policies that Gov. Romney and nine Republicans in Congress want to go back to.”

Plouffe also reaffirmed his approval of tax cuts in a separate interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s This Week.

Speaking about the manner in which President Obama dealt with the American financial crisis, which included a two year extension of the Bush tax cuts, Plouffe admitted that those decisions were, “politically hard, but stepped up and stabilized our financial system and the economy.”

Plouffe again highlighted how Obama dealt with the economic recession in his response to a question about the role that the United States should have  in dealing with the European economic crisis.

After noting that President Obama believes the Europeans have the means to solve the economic crisis on their own, Plouffe stated, “I think there can be some lessons learned for how we dealt with our crisis. And, again, tough steps, none of them easy.”

Plouffe was again pressured on President Obama’s economic agenda during a separate interview with Candy Crowley on CNN’s State of the Union. Crowley refused to let Plouffe get away with his suggestion that the president’s economic plan was the “right way to get $4 trillion in deficit reduction.”

She then reminded him that the Obama administration has already had four years.

Crowley showed further signs of skepticism when Plouffe said more work was needed on certain reforms that President Obama planned to enact,  asking him, “So what makes you think that you can accomplish in the next four years what haven’t been able to accomplish now?”

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