Voter ID Laws Blasted by Civil Rights Groups, Unions

Voter ID laws are going to be a hot-button issue in 2012, as civil rights groups the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and La Raza and other liberal groups are looking to target and strike down the laws in swing states this fall.

Because the Left no longer has Gov. Scott Walker (R-Wisc.) to kick around after he survived his recall election last Tuesday, pro-union forces are looking to derail the efforts of Republican governors who appear to be threatening their interests.

Unions are now taking the issue head on with the AFL-CIO’s “My Vote, My Right” campaign, meant to combat the “unprecedented attacks on voter rights.”

The AFL-CIO and it’s allies said they would be targeting key states, such as Pennsylvania, Florida, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and Nevada, all of which are coincidentally in play in this year’s presidential election between President Barack Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney.

However, in the past, Americans have not typically been on board with stopping voter ID laws.

In March the Obama Administration blocked a Texas law that would have required IDs at polling places. According to a recent Rasmussen poll, 56 percent of respondents opposed blocakage of Texas’ bill.

In a separate Rasmussen poll conducted in April, 73 percent of respondents said they did not believe photo ID requirements were discriminatory in any way, and 64 percent said voter fraud was at least a somewhat serious problem in the U.S.

One conservative Governor leading the charge in the fight to require a photo ID at the polls is Florida Governor Rick Scott, whose state is being sued by the Department of Justice for attempting to purge thousands of illegal immigrants from the Sunshine State’s voter roles.

The Justice Department cited the Voting Rights Act and the National Voter Registration Act on why Scott and the State of Florida should not move forward with stricter laws.

Scott said on Monday that Florida will sue the Department of Homeland Security, and continue its effort to pursue the voter ID laws.

Democrats and critics of Scott claim the real reason voter ID legislation is being passed is because Republicans are trying to “purge” Democratic voters in time for this fall’s election.

Liberals are especially critical of Florida’s plan because they feel it will disproportionately affect minority voters. They are now trying to unite civil rights and labor groups against Republican-led efforts to pass voter ID laws.

Because Democrats know that President Barack Obama might be in trouble in this year’s election, the Election Year outrage over Voter ID laws is both an attempt to rally the Democratic base and to fight back against legislation that will stop liberal groups from corrupting the election process as ACORN infamously did in  2008.

Comments

Comments

  1. Rich K says:

    Once again a commonsense measure like voter ID becomes a partisan volleyball. Think about it, why would you want to allow fraud at the voting place? We require voters to register don’t we? So what’s wrong with matching up a registered voter with a positive identification? It would seem to me that anyone who’s against voter ID laws has thoughts of fraud on their minds. Jimmy Carter was a proponent of voter ID laws, so why are the Dems up in arms?