Campaign: Ron Paul’s not finished yet

Ron Paul might no longer be scheduling campaign appearances, but his campaign wants to assure that the candidate is not suspending or ending his campaign just yet.

“Let me be very clear. Dr. Paul is NOT dropping out or suspending his campaign,” Paul campaign spokesman Jesse Benton wrote in an email to supporters.

The campaign has taken to adopting a guerilla strategy aimed at picking up delegates at district and state conventions rather than campaigning in primary states.

Paul hinted at this sort of a strategy during a March campaign appearance at the University of Maryland where he stressed that the race wasn’t over because “they haven’t stopped counting delegates yet.”

Benton notes that Paul recently won Maine and hopes that more will come.

“We will win party leadership positions at both the state and national levels,” Benton wrote. “We will continue to grow our already substantial total of delegates.”

The Paul campaign concedes that Mitt Romney has all but the GOP nomination locked up, being within 200 delegates of the 1,144 needed to secure the nomination.

Nontheless, the campaign suggests that its main interest is in having an impact on the party platform at the Republican National Convention in Tampa come August.

The campaign hopes to inject ideas such as monetary-policy reform, prohibitions against indefinite detention and Internet freedom into the platform.

“[B]y sending a large, respectful and professional delegation to Tampa, we will show the party and the country that not only is our movement growing, but the future belongs to us,” Benton wrote.



  1. Saipul says:

    Claudia Wright, a retired high scoohl teacher of history, government, and civics is uniquely qualified and positioned to represent Utah’s 2nd congressional district in the US House. If any state needs a lesson in civics, it is Utah, and if anyone can give Utah that civics lesson without alienating people, it’s Claudia Wright. I’d love to see her oust Jim Matheson, whose voting record closely follows his corporate campaign contributions and who has a distinct disdain of mingling with his ordinary, less-affluent constituents. I can’t see Jim Matheson debating anyone, but I can very well see Claudia Wright successfully taking on the extreme right-wing constitutionalists also running for this seat. If Claudia Wright and her 100% volunteer-run grassroots campaign can force Jim Matheson into a primary despite obstinate opposition from the Utah Democratic Party establishment and Matheson supporter Steny Hoyer (check out their mutual PAC contributions), they do have a good chance of defeating Matheson for good and of defeating the Republican nominee, extreme right-wing Republican Morgan Philpot. Yet Claudia Wright still faces tremendous opposition from the nay-sayers in her own party who claim that only a Democrat who is really a Republican (i.e. Matheson) can win in this district. The Utah Democratic Party is still engaging in a defensive politics of cynicism while Claudia Wright’s campaign is running on an offensive politics of hope. The life and future of the Utah Democratic Party is at stake. Will Utah Democrats stand behind a corporate Democrat who really isn’t one because of fear of losing the seat? Or will Utah Democrats rally around Claudia Wright who inspires voters every time she speaks? A party of Nope or a party of Hope. That’s the precipice on which the Utah Democratic Party hangs today.