Chicago City Board Proposes Soda Tax

The city of Chicago is considering a lucrative tax on soda, Fox Chicago reports:

On Tuesday, the Chicago City Council is hearing arguments over a proposed tax on sugary drinks.

Ald. George Cardenas (12th) wants Chicago to charge a 15- to 35-cent tax on drinks to reduce consumption and lower obesity rates. […]

The Yale Rudd Center for Food, Policy and Obesity has a calculator where cities can learn how many gallons of sugar-sweetened beverages are consumed by residents, and how much a tax would generate. Their calculations find that a 1 cent per ounce tax in Chicago could bring in $129 million/year.


Read more at the Free Beacon



  1. Yovanny says:

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