Mitt Romney’s Mormonism vs. Jeremiah Wright’s Moronism

Just as it’s becoming clear Mitt Romney will be the first major party Mormon presidential nominee, we’re seeing a predictable uptick in the frequency of stories about his zany religion.

In “7 Questions for Mitt About Mormonism,” RealClearReligion columnist Jeffrey Weiss intones, “[I]t is past time for Mitt Romney to address relevant questions about his religion.”  Weiss casts a suspicious eye on such un-American Latter-Day Saint doctrines as “If we have been frugal and saved for a rainy day, then we can more easily weather the financial storm.  If we have lived beyond our means, then we pay the consequences of our own actions when the bills come.”  Social Darwinism alert!

At Renaissance Women, Tricia Erickson laments the onslaught of “A Mormon One-World-Theocracy Brought To You By Mitt Romney.”  She labels the faith “an unconstitutional religion” and argues that a President Romney would harm U.S. interests if so directed by “the Mormon infallible Prophet.”

The Christian Broadcasting Network’s Chief Political Correspondent David Brody worries aloud to CNN that Romney hasn’t spent enough time pandering to Evangelicals.  MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell trashes Mormonism as “made-up.”  Bill Maher calls it “so ridiculous even Tom Cruise wouldn’t join it.”

Since the media are so obsessed with investigating candidates’ religious associations, how might the doctrine Obama absorbed for 20 years at Trinity United Church of Christ — read: Black Liberation Theology (BLT) — inform his approach to governing?  How might BLT’s canonization of “redistributive justice” and “racial reparations” affect Obama’s ruling philosophy?

Isn’t this a question the media should have asked four years ago?

Coincidentally, Obama mentor and racial “reconciliator” Jeremiah Wright, who retired from Trinity United during the 2008 presidential campaign after ABC News aired a string of his horrific utterances, delivered three sermons last week in West Virginia to enraptured audiences.

When he wasn’t crotch-grabbing, miming marijuana puffs, and spitting out tracks by Lil Wayne and Ludacris, Reverend Wright:

•    Disparaged the U.S. military and stated that “fighting for peace is like raping for virginity.”

•    Claimed that “white supremacy” drives “world policy.”

•    Declared that Clarence Thomas is “worshiping some other God”—the “god of racists,” the “god of white supremacy.”

•    Called Thomas Jefferson “a pedophile.”

And that was just in the introduction!

It’s true that both candidates adhere to faiths that are slightly out of alignment with mainstream Protestant thought.  So perhaps a comparative analysis is in order:

•    Mormonism is a branch of the Latter-Day Saint movement, an outgrowth of Protestantism that started in the 1820s.

Trinity United Church of Christ, Barack Obama’s place of worship for two decades, is affiliated with Black Liberation Theology, and UCC is an outgrowth of Protestantism that formed in 1957.

•    LDS has exploded to 14 million members, despite a history of religious persecution, libel, geographic expulsion, a “Mormon Extermination Order” issued by Missouri in 1838, and the murder of its founder by the Illinois militia in 1844.

UCC’s numbers have dwindled from 2 million at its founding to 1 million today.

•    Mormonism relies on the Bible and supplementary texts such as The Book of Mormon and The Doctrine and Covenants of the Church, both authored by movement founder Joseph Smith.

Black Liberation Theology relies on the Bible and supplementary texts such as Black Theology and Black Power and The Communist Manifesto, both authored by leftist nut jobs.

•    Mainstream Mormonism long ago abandoned the fundamentalist practice of polygamy.

Mainstream Black Liberation Theology-influenced churches still enjoy inflammatory practices such as demonizing America and race-baiting.

•    Romney proudly adheres to his faith, despite the bigotry much of the public displays against it.

Obama pragmatically chose his church because of its progressive credentials and endorsement of redistributive justice.  He speedily disowned his church and reverend when they became politically problematic.

•    Mormonism is roughly politically synchronous with most Protestant denominations.

The United Church of Christ leans far, far left.  Its Justice and Witness Ministries have endorsed: socialized medicine; a living wage; global warming regulations; strong public unions; elimination of all nuclear weapons; opposition to Israel’s right to defend itself; divestment from Israel; and support for Puerto Rican indepentista terrorists.

There is no convincing evidence that Obama disagrees with Black Liberation Theology or any of the above UCC positions.

Yet we’re supposed to faint in horror over a preppy, clean-cut, limited-government businessman and presidential candidate who wears magic underwear.

Comments

Comments

  1. Thanks for the shout-out!

    Four years ago, I was one of many journalists asking questions about Wright and Obama’s faith. Whether or not the answers satisfied anybody, there can be no denying that the questions were asked — and that Obama replied.

    In Romney’s case questions about how his faith inform his policies are even more relevant. Romney spent a decade as a ward bishop and stake president for the LDS church. Obama was a guy in a pew. Comparable questions to him would be about Constitutional law, since he was supposed to be an expert in that.

    I am totally uninterested in a political sense about what Mormons (or Romney) believe about God, Jesus, the afterlife, etc. My questions are only about how his understanding of his faith might inform (or not) his thoughts about policy and governance.

    Put it this way: If a priest, rabbi or imam were running for president, would you want to know how their understanding of their faith informed their ideas of governance? I surely would.

    1. Chet Harris says:

      Why is there any new questions about Mitt and how his beliefs will effect his decision making that wouldn’t have been answered in a century of Mormon politicians. The Governor of a State is in effect the President of that sovereignty. He is head of the executive branch of State government and the commander-in-chief of its military forces. Ask yourself how a Mormon Governor of the State of Utah has let his religion effect the choices in the execution of his office. I believe this question & answer period is long since played out. If Mitt has made it this far, then any radical thinking would have surfaced in State politics.

      I found the following page quite interesting. It shows the incredible diversity in the Mormon Church and how each has served his/her country, which seems to be with patriotism and passion. There are many other pages on Mormon politicians and their track record in serving in public office…

      Famous Mormons in Politics @ http://famousmormons.net/pol.html

      I left the Mormon church as a teenager over personal opinions towards the whole idea of Christianity and I no longer believe in the Atonement & Faith. I believe in more of a Karma & Experience thing. I still have NO hesitation to put a Mormon in the White House. Catholic JFK was in my book a fantastic President and my personal Hero for telling “The Fed” to go to hell. I believe that the Catholic church is internally evil (NOT the members, so spare me any rhetoric). But that wouldn’t stop me from voting for any man or woman that has a firm belief in a Supreme Being and loves this Republic.

  2. Rachid says:

    Jon; What can’t you understand? We’ve been here befroe. Everyone within Christianity with the exclusions of the LDS, JW’s, and a very few small extreme sects that call themselves Christian ; consider all denominations Christian . Yes, there are differences in ecclesiology, and particular variations, yet the essential elements of Christianity are all there. A Catholic still considers Lutherans Christian, as well as all the reformed sects/denomination, and visa versa. Lutherans believe Baptists and the Assembly of God as well as all the others to be Christians, and visa versa. Yes, there is disagreement on specific areas, yet those subjects do not hinder anyone from being qualified to be called Christian. Those subjects are called; errors . (A shocking word). The accusation of error still does not qualify as heresy, or put them in the category of non christian. You place division where no division exists. There is always opportunity for correction of error when there is dialogue, and there are constantly on-going meetings with different denominations on these very subjects, and over coffee tables by individuals.You blow way out of proportion the differences, and ignore the commonality of all things Christian as wishfull thinking to break down the unity of all things Christian.It would be more accurate to consider those differences between denominations as a family discussion/argument. It is really none of your business as an atheist neighbor from across the street to meddle in those family disagreements. Many of the earlier disagreements, (errors) have been resolved, or tolerated with respect, yet some still continue. Yet they are none of your business. If you are not part of the Christian community, mind your own business, and do some housekeeping in your own household.I fully expect your response to be mind your own business and leave us atheist alone too. That can be done, but are you really against any dialogue of a constructive/understanding nature? Unless you are a Bob, I would like to think not. Besides that would be against the great commission , (Matt 28:16-20; Go ye therefore to all the nations . If you reject it , that is up to you. No one can force you. I believe you and yours simply don’t want to hear any of it, and are offended by it. So be it, but stay out of family disagreements, as they do not cross over to your side of the street, and trying to capatilize on them.

Jonathan Gruber raps to MIT students

If you’ve been dying to see Jonathan Gruber, who credited the “stupidity of the American voter” with passing Obamacare, strip down to his undershirt and rap about economics, today is your lucky day!

Stewart mocks the Iowa Freedom Summit

Jon Stewart’s coverage of the Iowa Freedom Summit is about what you would expect—starting with his description the event: “A lot of Republicans who will never be president met this weekend,” for the “Fox News correspondent auditions.”

McCain takes on 'Sniper' bashers

Sen. John McCain is the latest person in a position of prominence to defend "American Sniper" from bashers, singling out the "obsessive critics of U.S. foreign policy" in an official statement.

Michael Moore continues on about snipers

Filmmaker Michael Moore has already stirred the pot with his negative comments about military snipers. During the weekend, somebody must've given the man an even bigger ladle.

Dropkick Murphys 'literally hate' Walker

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's abiding love for the Dropkick Murphys is not exactly mutual:

White House

VP Biden appears on ‘The Ellen DeGeneres Show’ to get ask young people to sign up for Obamacare
With three weeks to go until the Obamacare deadline to purchase insurance, the Obama administration is pulling out all the stops to encourage young people to sign up.  The renewed push included a stop by Vice President Joe Biden on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” Monday so he could appeal to moms who are good at […]
Small drone crashes at White House complex, origin unclear
WASHINGTON (AP) — A small drone flying at low altitude crashed into the White House complex before dawn Monday, the Secret Service said. President Barack Obama was not at home and the White House said it did not pose a security threat. The crash prompted an immediate lockdown of the White House grounds until officials […]
WH chief of staff blurts out previously-concealed name of American hostage on live TV

All in a day's work at the White House: sometimes you keep ISIS hostage names a secret, sometimes you let them slip in an in interview on national TV.

7 Times Obama was ‘Partisan,’ Not ‘Practical’ during his State of the Union address
Near the beginning of his State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Obama promised to be “practical, not partisan” in his proposals to Congress. However, his speech ended up being anything but. From cracking jokes to outright veto threats, it was clear that the president had no interest in bipartisanship. So we decided to […]
Obama has been reminding Republicans ‘I won’ for 2,189 days

President Obama trotted out one of his favorite talking points against Republicans yet again Tuesday night, reminding the opposition party that "I won."

Congress

Boehner and McConnell critique SOTU

“Dead. Real dead.” That was House Speaker John Boehner’s verdict on President Obama’s tax proposals--and nearly every proposal from his State of the Union address, with the exception of cybersecurity, fighting ISIS, trade, and possibly the childcare tax credit.

Senate surpasses its 2014 vote total in a week
Is this what the Senate looks like without Harry Reid in charge? The new Republican-led Senate has already voted on more amendments in just one week than the Democratic-controlled Senate voted on in all of 2014. “We’ve actually reached a milestone here that I think is noteworthy for the Senate. We just cast our 15th roll-call vote […]
Whistleblowers denounce DOJ juvenile program

According to whistleblower reports, a Justice Department (DOJ) juvenile delinquency program provided grants to states jailing foster children and runaways over minor offenses like skipping school.

Gohmert: Obama 'divisive on the issue of race'

There’s a reason reporters clamored around former-House-Speaker-candidate Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.) at the State of the Union like this:

Rand Paul slams SOTU’s ‘lack of sincerity’ on NSA

Senator Rand Paul spent Wednesday morning blasting Obama’s State of the Union address, telling a roomful of conservatives at the Capitol Hill Club that “Some of the stuff, frankly, was difficult to even listen to and keep a straight face.”