RNC Done Playing Games; Begins Fundraising with Romney

Enough is enough, the Republican Party Headquarters appeared to say Monday.

Monday evening news broke that the Republican National Committee would begin jointly fundraising with Mitt Romney this week for the General Election. The RNC’s decision to team up with Romney is a clear sign the that national party has grown tired of Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul and Rick Santorum’s claims they can still win the GOP nomination, despite the fact that Romney now has more than half the number of delegates needed to secure the nomination.

Although the three other remaining candidates were also given the opportunity to raise money alongside the RNC, they declined, which GOP consultants told the Wall Street Journal was to be expected. Low on funds, the other GOP candidates are more focused on raising enough money to beat Mitt Romney in the primary than raising money for long shot General Election campaigns.

After Romney’s predicted wins tomorrow in Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia, the GOP frontrunner will have more than two times as many delegates as Santorum, his next closest opponent. Gingrich no longer has the ability to win the 1,144 required delegates outright but is now trying to win the nomination by wooing uncommitted delegates away from other candidates. Paul has a similar eleventh-hour strategy.

Gingrich infamously released an “internal memo” from his campaign on the night of the Mississippi and Alabama primaries claiming he could still win the nomination. The memo claimed the race would merely at be at “halftime” when the Louisana primary came knocking the following week. After mass criticism from political pundits and even supporters, the Gingrich campaign retracted it’s statement merely hours later and claimed Newt would take his campaign to Tampa for a chance to sweet-talk his way to the nomination on the convention floor. As the race dragged on it became clear that Gingrich was not intersted in even trying play in the second half of the game, and last week, Gingrich announced he was downsizing his staff and campaign schedule.

Ron Paul, who looked to be a real contendor in the race this year, started off with a bang in Iowa and New Hampshire but quickly fizzled out for unknown reasons. Despite attracking a large number of young supporters to his candidacy, the Paul campaign never could figure out how to mobilize his support – particularly his online support -  into tangible voter turnout.

For the last month, Romney’s only real challenge in the presidential primary has come from Rick Santorum, who gained support among a large block of conservatives in the party who still have not forgiven Romney for supporting Massachusetts’ health care law – AKA Romneycare – during his time as Governor. Additionally, Santorum had his own difficulties solidifying support within the party, because of his own political woes, including his support for No Child Left Behind and Benedict Arlen.

In the last several weeks, notable Republicans and Tea Party favorites had begun to rally around Romney, including American Conservative Union Chairman Al Cardenas, House Budget Committee Chairman and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan and Florida Senator Marco Rubio.

Over the weekend Senate Minority Leader and Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell said  in an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday,“The chances are overwhelming that [Romney] will be our nominee. We’re in the final phase of wrapping up this nomination.”

As recently as last weekend Santorum said the state he once represented, Pennsylvania, which goes to the polls on April 24, was a must-win state for his campaign. But today he changed his tune and claimed his campaign was focusing on winning May’s contests, indicating that he intends to stay in the race even if Romney beats him on his home turf later this month.

The RNC’s actions are not unusual for this point in the presidential cycle. In 2008 the party committee began raising funds with John McCain even though he was not yet the nominee either.

The RNC has been criticized for failing to limit the number of presidential debates this cycle, which has helped draw out the length of the contest by allowing certain candidates Newt Gingrich to debate their way to victory.

Critics have also questioned the RNC and DNC’s joint decision in 2010 to delay the presidential nominating process by penalizing states that hold their primaries ahead of Super Tuesday. Then-RNC Chairman Michael Steele has said the intent was not to drag out the primary longer than necessary but to stop states from having their primaries too early in the year.

As the Obama campaign and Organizing for America begin to ramp up their activities, the RNC appears to finally be putting it’s foot on the gas, too.

The only real remaining question is when Romney will officially win the nomination and begin raising money with the RNC full-time.

 

Comments

Comments

  1. Brian Brady says:

    “The RNC’s decision to team up with Romney is a clear sign the that national party has grown tired of Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul and Rick Santorum’s claims they can still win the GOP nomination, despite the fact that Romney now has more than half the number of delegates needed to secure the nomination.”

    …or they’re pulling a 2000 CNN West Florida move to influence the upcoming primaries. Had Bush not called out CNN for calling Florida, we very well may have had Al Gore as our 43rd President…exactly the way CNN wanted it.

    The RNC can do whatever it wants with Mitt Romney. It’s credibility is viewed as compromised, among the conservatives in the party, for 4-5 years now

Polititainment

'SNL' laughs at North Korea, Sony hacks
“Saturday Night Live” hit on North Korea and the Sony hacks twice this weekend, proving that unlike most of Hollywood, they aren’t scared of Kim Jong-un. The show started off with a bang, bringing back Mike Myers as Dr. Evil to interrupt the cold open and discuss his anger over the North Korea and Sony hacker […]
RNC asks theaters to show 'The Interview
The Sony hack and subsequent cancellation of “The Interview” has gone fully political. President Obama made an official statement on this decision and now the Republican National Committee is weighing in. RNC Chairman Reince Priebus asks that movie theaters not bow down to North Korea and stand up to this decision by screening the film […]
Obama: LeBron 'did the right thing'

President Obama supports LeBron James' decision to wear an "I can't breathe" t-shirt during warmup before the NBA game between the Cleveland Cavaliers and Brooklyn Nets last week.

Al Sharpton, Hollywood's Sony Liaison

In a private meeting with Rev. Al Sharpton at the Greenwich Hotel in New York City Thursday, Sony Pictures chair Amy Pascal told Sharpton that he could have a voice in how the movie studio makes its films.

Clooney: Release 'The Interview' online

George Clooney may have the most awesomely toothy response to the Sony Pictures cyberattack that forced the movie studio to pull the film "The Interview" from its December 25 release.

White House

Obama: I will do ‘everything I can’ to close Guantanamo Bay
President Obama may have signed the defense bill that keeps Guantanamo Bay open for another year, but he is still verbally promising to close down the facility. Obama appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday and discussed closing Gitmo by the end of next year with host Candy Crowley. “I’m going to do everything […]
Obama: ‘We’re not going to be intimidated’ by Sony hackers
President Obama appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday morning and covered a variety of topics ranging from racism to North Korea and the Sony hacks. Obama repeated his earlier statements about the hacks, implying again that Sony made the wrong call by canceling screenings of “The Interview.” “The Boston Marathon suffered an actual […]
Obama: we can’t have censorship subject to ‘some dictator someplace’

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama declared Friday that Sony "made a mistake" in shelving a satirical film about a plot to assassinate North Korea's leader, and he pledged the U.S. would respond "in a place and manner and time that we choose" to the hacking attack on Sony that led to the withdrawal. The FBI blamed the hack on the communist government.

U.S. confirms North Korea was behind Sony attack and promises ‘proportional’ response

Officials no longer merely suspect North Korea to be behind the cyberattack on Sony Picture—they’ve confirmed it.

District court declares Obama’s executive action on immigration unconstitutional
A federal court in Pennsylvania declared parts of President Obama’s executive actions on immigration unconstitutional Tuesday. Judge Arthur J. Schwab, sitting in the western district of Pennsylvania, said presidents do have the power to use discretion in deciding how to enforce laws, but found that Obama’s recent executive action went much further than that.  He said Obama was writing […]

Congress

House GOP wants to give Obama coal for Christmas
President Obama is getting nothing but a lump of coal from House Republicans this Christmas. But he’s not getting it because he’s been naughty — although some would certainly argue he fits that description — instead, it’s to teach him about the country’s resource that “holds the potential for a 21st-century economic revival.” Rep. Mike […]
Rubio, Paul feud continued on ABC's 'This Week'
Likely 2016 presidential hopefuls Marco Rubio and Rand Paul have been going after each other all week for statements made on President Obama’s decision to normalize relations with Cuba and the feud did not take a break over the weekend. The Florida senator, one of the most outspoken critics of the new Cuba policy, appeared on […]
Rubio says Rand Paul is clueless on Cuba

Sen. Marco Rubio made his criticism of a fellow Republican plain Thursday night.

Gowdy's office responds to Speaker chatter

Rep. Trey Gowdy has become a sensation on the Right, with his no-nonsense style and committee hearing takedowns of Obama officials garnering him praise and attention.

Rand Paul: 'Opening up Cuba is a good idea'

Sen. Rand Paul broke with the Republican Party's prevailing argument against President Obama's Cuba policy Thursday, saying the move toward opening trade with the long-embargoed nation "probably" is a good idea.