Deadline Extended

Know a young conservative who should be on Red Alert's 2015 '30 Under 30' List? Nominate them by May 29.

Radical Left-Wing Attorneys Lead Obama DOJ’s Fight Against Voter ID Laws

Attorney General Eric Holder has stacked the deck against Voter ID laws by sidelining more experienced nonpartisan attorneys and by replacing them with radical leftists intent on overturning them, according to former Bush Justice Department figures.

J. Christian Adams, a former Bush DOJ official, told Hill staffers at a Friday lunch sponsored by the Republican National Lawyers Association (RNLA) that these appointments shed light on Holder’s recent decision to block Voter ID laws in Texas and Wisconsin.

“…[T]he ranks of new civil servants arriving in Holder’s civil  rights shop in protected civil service slots are among the most strident ideologues,” former Bush DOJ official and current Heritage Fellow Hans von Spakovsky wrote in an August 8, 2011 blog on Pajamas Media.

These attorneys include people like Michelle McLeod, who interned with the SEIU’s New York Civic Participation Project; Bradley Heard, a veteran of the radical left-wing Advancement Project and Catherine Meza, a veteran of the National Council of La Raza and the radical Mexican-American Legal Defense Fund, among others.

“Government doesn’t need to overreach,” Adams said. “The Department of Justice are really being activist, and their arguments are approaching this from an activist [perspective] and not a legal one.”

Currently, 16 states require voter IDs for voters on Election Day, and six states, now including Pennsylvania have passed strong Voter ID laws.

Adams says the liberal editorial press has been attempting to provide cover for Holder’s partisan Justice Department by arguing that conservatives have created a non-issue or that Voter ID laws discriminate against minorities.

“The Supreme Court said that Voter ID laws were not unconstitutional, but it did not say that they were constitutional,” Adams said.

But the intelligentsia rhetoric doesn’t match the positions taken by several minority Democratic state legislators who have led the fight for Voter ID laws in their states, according to Adams.

For example, several black Democratic state legislators led the push for Voter ID laws in Rhode Island and elsewhere around the country.

“I think that party leaders have tried to make this a Republican versus Democrat issue. It’s not. It’s simply a good government issue,” State Rep. Jon Brien, D-R.I. , told Stateline. “Those who are opposed to voter ID,” Brien adds, “never let the facts get in the way of a really good emotional argument.”

Adams questioned the timing of the DOJ actions suggesting they would not be complete before November.

RNLA put out a press release earlier this week charging the action against Texas amounted to “putting partisan politics above reality and the law” and that the decision was “not based on accurate data or the merits of the argument.”

But  the Democrats’ 2006 reauthorization of the federal Voting Rights Act created a wrinkle that states will have to contend with in the face of the DOJ onslaught.

Democrats’ inserted the word “any” into Section Five of the Voting Rights Act, meaning that states like Mississippi, New Hampshire and Wisconsin require DOJ approval before changing their Voter ID laws. The change in the law also put the burden of proof on the states to show they did not have “any” discriminatory impact.

The 2006 revision of the Voting Rights Act also eliminated the ability of states to point to mitigating factors such as having a program to assist voters in obtaining free voter IDs.

The Holder Justice Department has created what Adams calls the 20 percent “Pufferfish” in its challenge to South Carolina’s Voter ID laws, which amounts to using deceptive math to achieve its ends.

The DOJ sent a letter to the state of South Carolina challenging its Voter ID law, claiming that minority registered voters were 20 percent more likely to disenfranchised by the state’s law than whites. But in reality, Adams notes, the difference between the number of black voters and the number of white voters with valid IDs is 1.6 percent.

Adams warned that Virginia, where many DOJ bureaucrats live, could be one of the next states to taste Holder’s wrath against its new Voter ID law.

Adams suggested that conservatives change their arguments defending Voter ID laws because many of the comparisons being made – such as needing to have ID to buy Sudafed – are not direct corollaries because they are not constitutional issues.

Instead, he suggested that conservatives message around the need for IDs to get a marriage license because marriage is considered a constitutionally protected right. Yet no one has of yet argued that such laws disenfranchise minorities.

“They are asking evidence of significant in-person voter fraud,” Adams said. “Justice doesn’t have the authority to do that.”

Comments

Polititainment

McGowan posts fake Cruz quote on Duggar
Amid the fallout of the Duggar scandal last week, many have spoken up with opinions, including liberal actress Rose McGowan who posted a made-up quote from Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and later issued a reluctant, almost-apology. The Charmed actress’ not-so-charming tweet included a meme from the self-proclaimed “For Entertainment Purposes Only” website titled, “Stop the World, […]
Anti-Stephanopoulos artwork invades NYC

Posters depicting ABC News anchor George Stephanopolous and a smiling Hillary Clinton with the words "PayPal" and "Donate" written on them have been popping up close to the studio where ABC shoots Good Morning America.

Rubio gets first celeb endorsement

The Florida senator and official GOP candidate for president has just received a big celebrity endorsement from Rick Harrison of the popular show "Pawn Stars," according to a report in the Las Vegas Sun.

Snoop Dogg endorses Hillary Clinton

Snoop Dogg became the latest rapper to endorse the Democratic presidential candidate during his appearance on Bravo's "Watch What Happens Live" over the weekend.

John Oliver shocked by House NSA reform

John Oliver was shocked to hear that the House recently passed NSA reform.

2016

If campaign songs were honest

Campaign songs--that signature tune that accompanies a candidate at every amped-up campaign rally--can say a lot about a candidate.

Pot advocate hopes to change Hillary's mind
While Hillary is busy picking out which pantsuit to wear to a Florida fundraiser on Friday, her brassy host is prepping for her conversion on a much less predictable talking point– the legalization of marijuana. Trial attorney and outspoken medical-marijuana advocate John Morgan will host Clinton and her supporters in his Florida home this weekend, according […]
The 7 most hideous Hillary campaign store items

Instead of forcing you to browse through all the (mostly overpriced) items, I thought I'd give you a sampling of the truly most outrageous accessories, signs and clothing pieces put up for sale by the Clinton campaign ... and what they really say about those who buy them.

Sanders: Hillary Clinton hustles money

The Democratic presidential candidate recently told CNBC chief Washington correspondent John Harwood over a meal at a speakeasy that Hillary and Bill Clinton's lifestyle likely precludes them from being able to identify with the regular Americans who a truly struggling in the current economy.

Huckabee: Americans most distrustful of government

Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee claimed on Fox News Sunday over the weekend that Americans are more distrustful of government than ever.

Policy

Gun rights may be coming to NYC
Just last week Federal Judge Frederick J. Scullin struck down D.C.’s requirement that residents show “good reason” for needing a concealed carry permit. Now that battle may be spreading across the country. According to the New York Post, other anti-gun cities like New York City may be facing similar constitutional objections. New York City currently […]
Court rules DMV may ban pro-life license plates

A federal appeals court has ruled that New York can ban pro-life license plates as “patently offensive” messages that might drive someone to “road rage.”

NSA claims to be shutting down bulk surveillance

With key Patriot Act provisions soon expiring, and no legislative extension in sight, the question now becomes: will the NSA actually shut down their metadata program?

George W. volunteered to officiate a gay wedding

This year, journalists have been asking practically every Republican candidate whether they would attend a gay wedding—and have received a wide variety of answers.

Lindsey Graham rolls eyes during Rand Paul speech

Lindsey Graham's eyeballs practically fell out of his sockets when Rand Paul rose to speak against the NSA Friday night.